Local Area Information (just some tasters)

Roque Gageac

Roque Gageac

This very attractive and picturesque little village lies near the slow flowing river Dordogne and is built against a limestone rock face covered with oak trees. Take a stroll up the winding streets to the Troglodyte dwellings or take a relaxing river cruise. La Roque-Gageac is the most visited tourist attraction in France after Mont-saint-Michel and Rocamadour. 30 minutes drive.

Castelnaud

Castelnaud

At Castlenaud there’s a magnificent castle - 12th through 15th century that was the rival of the Beynac fortress during the 100-years war. This castle is extremely beautiful and has been painstakingly restored and is crammed with medieval weaponry. There are several audio visual displays and interactive games for children. Castelnaud also houses working trebuchets and catapults. The views from its walls are some of the most stunning in Périgord. 25 minutes drive.

Belvès

Belvès

It was fortified in the Middle Ages because of its strategic position and came to be known as the “Pope’s city” as it was under Clement V’s protection. Belvès bears witness to a tormented past: the walls and the auditeur’s tower (11th c); the belfry (15th c) the city hall tower, the castle (14th/15th), the hotel with a Renaissance façade and troglodyte dwellings are examples of what Belvès has to offer. 30 minutes drive.

Domme

Domme

The cozy medieval, little bastide town of Domme (1281) lies high above the Dordogne on top of a rock plateau. Almost all the houses in Domme have recently been restored. It has already received first prize at the annual contest for the title of ‘most beautiful flower village in France’. The narrow, curvy streets, chunks of the city wall and the centuries-old houses lead to a magnificent market square with stunning views of the Dordogne valley. 35 minutes drive.

Collognes-la-Rouge

Collognes-la-Rouge

This town is very picturesque due to its fairy-tale, medieval houses built from red brick. The old houses used to be inhabited by nobility and have one or more little towers, of which the tip is covered by thatching or slate. Lush grape vines grow up against the walls of the houses that so resemble little castles. One hours drive.

Rocamadour

Rocamadour

This town is unimaginably beautiful, high above the deep and savage ravine of the Alzou, built in and on top of the rocks. It is one of the best located villages in France, which says a lot since France has many of those. Rocamadour is a celebrated place of pilgrimage with many sights worth visiting, such as: Porte du Figuier (13th century), where the cozy main street, Rue Roland du Figuier, cutting through the sheer rock face in different places, starts. From this street there’s a nice view of the crooked, topsy-turvey and ‘hanging’ houses; every square metre was used in building these characteristic, little houses. Apart from this climbing the 216 steps of the Grand Escalier is more than worth your while. This ‘stairway’ leads you past many interesting monuments to the Cité Religieuse. One hours drive.

Les Eyzies

Les Eyzies

This little village lies protected within a peaceful valley where the most interesting caverns of Europe can be found. These caves used to be inhabited many thousands of years ago as the exceptionally well-preserved wall paintings and innumerable objects, found in these caves, show. 30 minutes drive.

Sarlat

Sarlat

Sarlat is the undisputed tourist attraction of the Périgord Noir. It has a cozy and sublime, restored town centre that offers a dozen sights and very lively market places. The ochre coloured houses and the stair-case streets of the old centre occasionally drop to the background in favor of spacious squares on which border beguiling houses. Here the outdoor cafés, and colourful boutiques don’t cry out for attention, but add a recreational accent to this architectural diamond of the Dordogne. Some sights are: Place de la Liberté, Place André Malraux, Maison de la Boétie, Cathédrale St. Sacerdos, Cour des Fontaines etc. 40 minutes drive.

Montignac

Montignac

Montignac lies at the bank of the river Vézère and is well-known for the caverns of Lascaux, one of the most spectacular caverns in the world. The cavern was discovered in 1940 by school boys. Hundreds of paintings and drawings were discovered in the cavern that consisted of four galleries. The wall paintings were severely damaged by their being exposed to the open air. Because of this the caverns was closed off in 1963. In 1974 at approximately 200 metres of the real caverns a very precise copy of the ‘Grotte de Lascaux’ was opened. This is a world heritage site. One hours drive.

Monpazier

Monpazier

The cozy bastide town of Monpazier (1284) is one of the best-preserved bastides in the Périgord. This town is a perfect rectangle of 220 by 400 metres. The main street lies horizontally and the parallel side streets are bisected by four other side streets. Originally all houses were built the same size and only a narrow space was left between them to prevent fire from spreading too fast. The town centre consists of a cozy square with covered market places and a church. The little town is surrounded by a wall, a fortified town gate and towers for defense. 30 minutes drive.

Cahors

Cahors

Cahors, (Lot’s capital) is the home of truffles, goat’s cheese, confit de canard (duck conserve) and dark, potent Cahors wine which has been produced here since Roman times. The Saturday market is the best place to sample some of this wonderful cuisine and also get a feel for the laid-back atmosphere of the town itself.

It is situated on the river Lot and surrounded by hills. Its famous landmark is the Pont Valentre, an impressive medieval bridge with seven pointed arches that span the river. Apparently this bridge is one of the most photographed sights in France.

Cahors is a perfect base for exploring Quercy with its vineyards, medieval villages, castles and the spectacular limestone cliffs that flank the rivers Lot and Cele. 30 minutes drive.